Planning Branch

Planning Branch

State Emergency Response and Recovery Plan

The Arizona State Emergency Response and Recovery Plan (SERRP) is an all-hazards plan that identifies state agency roles and responsibilities during an emergency or disaster. The SERRP establishes the concept of operations for response and recovery as it applies to state agencies and partnering entities. This plan is implemented when any emergency or disaster reaches a level that overwhelms local, county, or tribal resources, or is determined by the Governor to constitute a state of emergency.

The SERRP integrates, supports, and consistent with federal guidance, including the National Response Framework and the National Disaster Recovery Framework. The plan also utilizes the National Incident Management System, the Incident Command System, and Core Capabilities as a basis for the structure.

The Planning Branch assists local, county, and tribal partners with emergency operations plans and other related planning documents.

 

Hazard Mitigation Planning Program

The intent of hazard mitigation planning is to identify risks and vulnerabilities associated with disasters as well as long-term strategies to reduce or eliminate impacts from future hazard events.

Mitigation plans can help communities become more sustainable and disaster-resistant by focusing efforts on the hazards, disaster-prone areas, and identifying appropriate mitigation measures. Effective mitigation planning and efforts can break the cycle of disaster damage, reconstruction, and repeated damage.

The DEMA Hazard Mitigation Planning Program assists local, county, and tribal governments in their efforts to ensure they have a plan to protect their citizens, existing and future development as well as economic, cultural, and environmental assets. Mitigation plans may also assist in minimizing post-disaster downtime, accelerating recovery time, and reducing disaster response and recovery costs. 

 

Continuity Planning Program

The mission of the Continuity Planning Program is to improve the State of Arizona agencies' preparedness, response, and recovery capabilities from all-hazard emergencies. This is achieved through continuity planning - an inwardly focused form of contingency planning that supports the agency's strategic plan and its continued delivery of essential services/functions. A proactive continuity program is considered a best business practice in supporting the state’s priorities of protecting our communities and fiscal responsibility by continuing to perform essential services/functions during any disruptive event.

Under Governor's Executive Order 2013-06, DEMA is responsible for developing a continuity program to help guide and assist state agencies in their continuity planning efforts, and each state agency is required to have a continuity of operations (COOP) plan. The Program document outlines continuity planning guidance. The Planning Branch also provides continuity of government planning assistance to local, county, and tribal governments.

 

National Incident Management System Program

The National Incident Management System (NIMS) is a comprehensive, nationwide, systematic approach to incident management for any situation regardless of cause, size, location, or complexity. NIMS is a set of standardized concepts and principles applicable to all threats, hazards, and events. Use of the system allows various organizations and jurisdictions to effectively work together during an incident to achieve common objectives. Governor's Executive Order 2007-23 designates NIMS as the basis for all incident management in Arizona.

The goal of the NIMS program in Arizona is to enhance statewide NIMS implementation. The Planning Branch provides NIMS outreach, education, and technical assistance to organizations and jurisdictions statewide.

 

Emergency Management Accreditation Program

The Emergency Management Accreditation Program (EMAP) is an accreditation process that evaluates emergency management programs on compliance with requirements in sixteen areas, including: planning; resource management; training; exercises, evaluations, and corrective actions; communications and warning; and administration. To achieve accreditation, applicants demonstrate through self-assessment, documentation, and peer assessments that its program meets the Emergency Management Standard.

EMAP accreditation confirms an emergency management program's capabilities of disaster preparedness and response systems. The Emergency Management Standard is flexible in design for programs of differing sizes, populations, risks, and resources to use it as a framework for improvement and attain compliance with those standards in an accreditation process. This program helps jurisdictions ensure quality emergency management systems. The State of Arizona has maintained accreditation since 2004. The Planning Branch assists interested local, county, and tribal partners with their EMAP programs.