Reasonable Accommodation (RA) Program Overview

Reasonable Accommodation (RA) Program Overview

The Rehabilitation Act of 1973

In 1973, the US Congress passed the Rehabilitation Act, which requires employers, like the AZNG, to provide reasonable accommodations to qualified employees or applicants with disabilities, unless doing so would present an undue hardship. A “qualified” employee or applicant is someone who can perform the essential functions of a position, with or without reasonable accommodations.

The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990

In 1990, the US Congress passed the Americans with Disabilities Act which extends many of the protections of the Rehabilitation Act to cover private employers.  Again, the focus is on ensuring that individuals with disabilities (IWD) are not the target of discrimination with regards to employment practices like hiring, firing, promotion, training and other opportunities.

What is a Reasonable Accommodation?

A reasonable accommodation (RA) is a change or adjustment made to a procedure, practice or workplace that allows an otherwise qualified individual to perform the essential functions of a job. Examples of RA might include things like adding an adjustable desk for someone who can’t sit or stand for extended periods, allowing telework for someone who can’t physically commute to work, or installing an accessible restroom facility.

What is an “Individual With Disabilities” (IWD)?

According to the law, an IWD is someone who has a physical or mental impairment that limits their ability to perform one or more major life activities, or someone who has a history of such an impairment or someone who is regarded as having such an impairment.

What is an undue hardship?

An undue hardship occurs when granting an RA would impact the operation and productivity of a workplace. For some employers, the cost of implementing an RA can be an undue hardship. For others, granting the RA might interfere with the overall operation of the workplace. For example, if granting the RA would diminish efficiency in other positions or  infringe on the rights/benefits of other employees, such an RA may be denied for imposing an undue hardship on the employer.

Who can request a reasonable accommodation?

Any employee or applicant for employment may request an RA. The need for an RA will not affect the individual’s employment if the employee is otherwise qualified to perform the essential functions of the position.

How does the reasonable accommodation process work?

Any employee or applicant for employment may request an RA. The need for an RA will not affect the individual’s employment if the employee is otherwise qualified to perform the essential functions of the position.

Current EEO & EO Personnel

 

Ms. Celeste Snyder, 

State Equal Employment Manager

[email protected]

602-629-4811

 

Mr. Anthony Castorina 

Equal Employment Specialist (Technicians)

[email protected] 

602-629-4836

 

MAJ Julie Jarvis - Army HREO 

[email protected]

602-267-2822 

MSG Renee Villegas, (Army EO)

[email protected] 

602-267-2657

 

1st Lt Erin Hopper, (162nd Air EO)

[email protected]

520-295-7052

 

 

TSgt Cynthia Tommy, (161st Air EO)

[email protected]

602-161-0020